Covers

This cover was designed for a communication paper published recently in Advanced Materials entitled High-Performance Conducting Polymer Nanofiber Biosensors for Detection of Biomolecules. It illustrates detection of neurochemicals using conducting polymer nanofibers formed on the neural microelectrodes. Sensitive detection and selective determination of the physiologically important chemicals involved in brain function have drawn much attention for the diagnosis and treatment of brain diseases and neurological disorders. This paper reports a novel method for fabrication of enzyme entrapped-conducting polymer nanofibers that offer higher sensitivity and increased lifetime compared to glucose sensors that are based on conducting polymer films.
Cover SM-MRA
This cover was designed for a communication paper published in Advanced Materials (2014, 18(14),2782–2787) entitled Hydrogel-Mediated Direct Patterning of Conducting Polymer Films with Multiple Surface Chemistries. This research is a collaborative work with Dr. Sheereen Majd's group. It illustrates the growth of micropatterned bioactive conducting polymer for biomedical applications. This article describes Hydrogel-mediated electropolymerization of conducting polymers. A new methodology for selective electropolymerization of conducting polymer films using wet hydrogel stamps is presented. The ability of this simple method to generate patterned films of conducting polymers with multi­ple surface chemistries in a one-step process and to incorporate fragile biomolecules in these films is demonstrated.
cover for advanced materials
This cover was designed for a review article published in Advanced Materials (2014, 26(12), 1846–1885). It illustrates neural recording/stimulation in central and peripheral nervous systems using microelectrodes . This review article provides an overview of state-of-the-art neural electrodes and advancements in electroactive nanomaterials including conducting polymers, carbon nanotubes, graphene, silicon nanowires, and hybrid organic-inorganic nanomaterials for neural interfaces. The authors discuss scientific challenges in biocompatibility, mechanical mismatch, and electrical properties faced by these nanomaterials for the development of longlasting functional neural interfaces.
cover for advanced materials
This cover was designed for a communication paper published in Advanced Materials (2013,  25(33), 4555–4560). It illustrates releasing of antitumor agents from biodegradable microspheres and killing tumor cells. This article describe the use of an electrojetting technique, whereby a conducting liquid is injected at a constant flow rate through a high-voltage electrified capillary tube, for the microencapsulation of the antitumor agent 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea into biodegradable polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid). The technique results in microcapsules having high drug encapsulation efficiency, tunable drug loading capacity, and narrow size distribution.
cover for advanced materials
This cover was designed by Prof. Mohammad Reza Abidian for a communication paper published in Advanced Healthcare Materials (2012, 1(6), 762-767). It illustrates regeneration of  axons through a conductive hydrogel conduit. In this paper the authors report a novel method for preparation of mechanically reinforced agarose nerve conduits that are then made conductive by use of a thin layer of conducting polymer pol(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT). Novel templating methods for the fabrication of conductive hydrogel guidance channels for axonal regeneration are designed and developed. PEDOT is electrodeposited inside the lumen to create fully coated-PEDOT agarose conduits and partially coated-PEDOT agarose conduits.
Cover for Advanced Materials
This cover was designed by Prof. Mohammad Reza Abidian for a communication paper published in Advanced Materials (2009, 21 (37), 3764-3770). It illustrates the use of conducting polymer nanotubes as highly selective neural interfaces for chronic neural recordings at the nanoscale. Microelectrodes implanted in the brain are increasingly being used to treat neurological disorders. However, robust and reliable chronic application of neural electrodes remains a challenge. Here, the authors report, the use of conducting polymer nanotubes as highly selective neural interfaces for chronic neural recordings. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) nanotubes were formed on the chronic neural microelectrode. The quality of neuronal spike recordings was significantly improved relative to metal electrode sites.
cover for advanced funcational materials
This cover was designed by Prof. Mohammad Reza Abidian for a paper published in Advanced Functional Materials (2009, 19 (4), 573-585). It illustrates the dexamethasone-loaded PLGA nanofibers on the surface of microfabricated neural electrodes. In this paper the authors  report a novel method for the fabrication of soft, low impedance, high charge density, and controlled releasing nanobiomaterials that can be applied for neural interfaces using drug loaded nanofibers, 3D conducting polymer nanostructures (PEDOT), and alginate hydrogel. The fabrication process includes electrospinning of anti-inflammatory drug-incorporated biodegradable nanofibers, encapsulation of these nanofibers by an alginate hydrogel layer, then electrochemical polymerization of conducting polymers around the electrospun drug-loaded nanofibers to form nanotubes and within the alginate hydrogel scaffold to form cloud-like nanostructures.
cover for advanced materials
This cover was designed by Prof. Mohammad Reza Abidian for a communication paper published in Advanced Materials (2006, 18 (4), 405-409). It shows the fabrication of dexamethasone-loaded PLGA nanofibers and Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) nanotubes on the surface of microfabricated neural electrodes. The authors describe controlled release of an anti-inflammatory drug from PEDOT nanotubes using electrical stimulation is demonstrated. The fabrication process includes electrospinning of a biodegradable polymer into which the drug has been incorporated, followed by electrochemical deposition of the conducting polymer around the drug-loaded electrospun nanoscale fibers.